Alex and Nick welcome Simon Taylor to hear his experience being a comedian, writing jokes for late-night television, and the hard work it takes to be consistently funny.

How does the stand-up circuit work? What was it like writing for the Tonight Show with Jay Leno? Why is performing comedy different than writing comedy? How is the process of writing comedy in a room compared to doing it alone? What can a writer do to be noticed and find a following?

The Paper Team performs their in-depth set…

SHOWNOTES

Content

1 – How Simon Taylor got his start (00:33)
2 – Being funny, creating your product, and performing stand-up (08:25)
3 – Putting yourself out there, selling yourself, and pitching (24:15)
4 – Writing for The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (34:22)
5 – Generating good content regularly and working your creative skills (38:53)
6 – What a successful joke is and tailoring it to your online (Twitter/Snapchat/YouTube) or real-life audience (43:35)
7 – Working on a TV pilot with Justin Willman, and writing alone for someone else versus a writers’ room for a common project (49:05)
8 – Working in the US, what Simon Taylor is doing now, and what is next for him (53:17)
Resources and Outro (57:50)

Links

Simon Taylor on Twitter
Rove Live
Rove McManus
The Glass House (2001 TV series)
Spicks and Specks
The Project
Steve Vizard
Shaun Micallef
Live on Bowen
The Loft Live
Simon Taylor hosting Live on Bowen (Video)
The Carmichael Show
The King of Kong
Vine
Sleight of Mouth with Justin Willman

Resources

Poking a Dead Frog – Mike Sacks
Books by Stewart Lee

If you enjoyed this episode (and others), please consider leaving us an iTunes review at paperteam.co/itunes! :)

You can find Paper Team on Twitter:
Alex@TVCalling
Nick@_njwatson
If you have any questions, comments or feedback, you can e-mail us: [email protected]

Alex and Nick welcome Franklin jin Rho (FOX’s The Exorcist) to discuss the ins and outs of being a TV script coordinator.

He shares with us his advice, anecdotes, tips, and tricks to understanding and getting into this vital TV position, set halfway between the writers’ room and production.

How do you become a script coordinator (especially when you have no experience)? What do showrunners look for in candidates? What are the interactions like between writers and production? What can you do to get that first script and transition up? Are there any must-know shortcuts to Final Draft?

The Paper Team offers some script revisions…

SHOWNOTES

Content

Thoughts on TV script coordinating, getting a position, and making the best out of it (00:33)
Outro (46:17)

Links

Franklin jin Rho on Twitter
The Exorcist (FOX)
AFI’s Directing Program
Friday Night Lights (NBC)
Film Independent’s Project Involve
The Assets (ABC)
Cole Fowler on IMDb
Konami Code
IBM’s Watson
Scriptation

If you enjoyed this episode (and others), please consider leaving us an iTunes review at paperteam.co/itunes! :)

You can find Paper Team on Twitter:
Alex@TVCalling
Nick@_njwatson
If you have any questions, comments or feedback, you can e-mail us: [email protected]

Alex and Nick explore the differences in what an episode looks like between episodic or procedural TV and serialized shows.

How has the TV episode evolved over the years? What does an episode mean in the age of binge-watching? What are some memorable stand-alone and serialized episodes?

The Paper Team offers a self-contained narrative…

SHOWNOTES

Content

1 – The Stand-Alone Episode (00:34)
2 – The Serialized Episode (13:23)
3 – What is a TV episode today? (35:34)
4 – Critical reception of Episodic vs. Serialized TV (42:45)
Next Week On (50:03)

Links

Masters of Horror
“22 Short Films About Springfield” (7×21 – The Simpsons)
“Window of Opportunity” (4×06 – Stargate SG-1)
“The Farnsworth Parabox” (4×15 – Futurama)
“Hush” (4×10 – Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
Donald Trump “Law & Order: SVU” Episode Gets Post-Election Airdate
6 Days to Air: The Making of South Park
“Restless” (4×22 – Buffy the Vampire Slayer)
“Grave Danger” (5×24-25 – CSI)
Monte-Carlo Television Festival
MIPTV Media Market
Coupling (US)
Law & Order: UK
Paris enquêtes criminelles
Babylon 5
The Cuckoo Hour
Dream On
“A Mother’s Work” (6×13 – Sons of Anarchy)
“Phase One” (2×13 – Alias)
“Other Things You Could Be Doing” (2×12 – You’re the Worst)
“Development Arrested” (3×13 – Arrested Development)
Why mythological shows are often idolized
NY Times Reviews Amazon’s Goliath Out of Order
“Two Boats and a Helicopter” (1×03 – The Leftovers)
“Guest” (1×06 – The Leftovers)
In Praise of Midbrow TV

Special thanks to Jason J. Cohn for helping us edit this episode.

If you enjoyed this episode (and others), please consider leaving us an iTunes review at paperteam.co/itunes! :)

You can find Paper Team on Twitter:
Alex@TVCalling
Nick@_njwatson
If you have any questions, comments or feedback, you can e-mail us: [email protected]

Alex and Nick discuss the value of paying for screenwriting education.
From graduate school to extension classes and books, we take a look at whether or not they’re worth your time or money to learn about TV writing.

What is the point of film school for television? Which extra classes are worth paying for? What are some of the best books on the subject?

The Paper Team opens their textbook…

SHOWNOTES

Content

A special e-mail and our own TV writing education (0:32)
Is film school worth it for TV? (10:08)
TV writing extension classes and books (14:53)
Takeaways & Resources (25:03)

Links

UCLA’s TFT mysterious “showrunner program”
UCLA’s Writing Extension Classes
Richard Hatem
The TV Writer’s Workbook by Ellen Sandler
Elephant Bucks by Sheldon Bull
The Cheeky Monkey by Tim Ferguson
The Coffee Break Screenwriter by Pilar Alessandra
Writing the TV Drama Series by Pamela Douglas
Small Screen, Big Picture by Chad Gervich
Desperate Networks by Bill Carter

Resources

BAFTA Guru
BBC Writers Room

Special thanks to Jason J. Cohn for helping us edit this episode.

If you enjoyed this episode (and others), please consider leaving us an iTunes review at paperteam.co/itunes! :)

You can find Paper Team on Twitter:
Alex@TVCalling
Nick@_njwatson
If you have any questions, comments or feedback, you can e-mail us: [email protected]

Hi there!

Alex Freedman

I'm Alex Freedman, the writer behind TV Calling.


I started this site in 2008 to chronicle my own journey in television writing.

650 posts later, TV Calling has also become a comprehensive resource dedicated to the full TV writing industry—from spec to success.


Everything here is written by yours truly (unless otherwise credited), so feel free to blame me for any missed deadlines.


I hope you'll answer your television calling, and join me in this creative journey.


Write on.


P.S.: New around? You should start here.

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